Broadway Park & Roeder Home Tour

Heather Carter Community, Event

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 Tuesday, August 4th – Broadway Park Tour and Picnic at the Roeder Home

Thanks to all of the wonderful people who came out to our walk and tree tour on Tuesday, August 4th! We had over 65 enthusiastic folks join in the walk, and even picked up a few more interested passersby as the tour progressed through the park.  After the walk, everyone returned to the Roeder Home for self-guided tours, cookies and lemonade, and some good conversation with our Foundation board members and fellow guests.

Special thanks to John Wesselink for leading our tour!  John shared a lot of knowledge in a fun and friendly manner. Thanks, John! We hope that we can team up for another walk/tour soon.

Check out a few photos from the event in our photo gallery or on Facebook

broadway-historic-map-large

Resources from the tour:   Trees of   Broadway Park Guide

Meet our Broadway Park tour guide John Wesselink:

… spent an unhealthy amount of time in arboreta, botanical gardens, college campuses, cemeteries, national, state, and local parks—even old sanitoria—looking at trees very closely.
John Wesselink
I’m John Wesselink. I’m a Western alumnus, class of 76, BA in Literary History with a minor in Art History,  and here I am, seemingly incongruously leading you on the tree tour. I’m completely self-taught in dendrology. . . that’s the study of trees and shrubs But I’m not a dendrologist. I haven’t done any of the coursework, and I’m certainly not an arborist as I often get called. I don’t plant ‘em, prune ‘em, disease treat ‘em, cut ‘em down, or climb up in them,  and the terms “tree expert” or “the tree man” that I hear occasionally would apply far more aptly and deservedly to others in the field than to me. What I have done to qualify for this gig is spent an unhealthy amount of time in arboreta, botanical gardens, college campuses, cemeteries, national, state, and local parks—even old sanitoria—looking at trees very closely. I’ve made tree maps of and guided tree tours through many of Bellingham’s parks I’ve given talks on Bellingham’s heritage trees.  When I retired from my day job back in 2007 I took an 18 month, 120,000-mile trip in a VW camper looking for the US’s 780 or so native tree species growing in their native ranges. . . . I found 760 of them. It was a great treasure hunt. In brief, what I am is a fellow with a pathological inability to walk by a tree without knowing what it is.